Russian Brunchclub

Cake bake-off winners – Napoleon No 10.

Irina is my compatriot. Originally from Kohtla-Yarve, a town in the Eastern part of Estonia that has a very high percentage of ethnic Russians, she came to the UK 14 years ago at the time when many of … ‘us’

Russian Brunchclub

Soviet Brunchclub – pies, virgins and piemes.

‘Thank you for letting us loose our virginity…’ they said at the end of an evening. Oh, don’t you just love giving people their firsts. their first Russian pie, their first uunderground restaurant, their first ‘proper’ tumble of Russian vodka,

Russian Brunchclub

Little poorly soviet pies.

Soviet pie. The soviet pie. There was a saying about soviet pies: «Если вы съели пирожок и не обнаружили в нем начинки – знайте, он был с мясом!» or ‘If you’ve eaten a pie and haven’t discovered any filling inside

Russian Brunchclub

Next Russian brunclub – it’s all about the pie…

‘[The pie] should be appetising, shameless in its nakedness, a temptation to sin’. Anton Chekhov If you thought that the Brits had a monopoly on loving the pie, or that pies can only be homely – I invite to re-think

Russian Brunchclub

Ukrainian banush – a hug and some action in one bowl.

Khrushev – that charismatic leader of the communist party in USSR in the 60s – is memorable on two accounts in my mind: for letting soviet couples to have sex in private and for introducing corn to the nation. With

Russian Brunchclub

Ukrainian brunch – eating off a face..

I have a healthy fascination with making people feel squeamish. As a food anthropologist (to be), I am interested in that instant, guttural reaction to foods – and food ideas – that provoke people to either shut down, reject or

Russian Brunchclub

Next Brunch Club announced – Ukraine and its lard(er)

After nearly a month of travelling in this fascinating, multifaceted, rich in soil and people’s stories, land, I would like to invite you to sample the delights of my exploration. And it is not all about salo, if  you wondered.

Russian Brunchclub

Sweet truffles, uniquely Estonian way.

If salo, Ukrainian iconic cured pork fat, is a dish that Ukrainians themselves both hate and loath, then Kama, a product quite unique to Estonia, is salo’s Northern cousine.  What is Kama? Well, in short, it is a very old

Russian Brunchclub

Cooking with hay.

Hay was used extensively by Russkis in the olden days – as well as by the English folk in fact. In makes sense after all. Peasants/farmers would have masses of hay around this time of the year and need to

Russian Brunchclub

Seducing pioneers – Caramelised ryebread icecream

They say Russians eat ice-cream in winter, in that winter, in particular in that winter. Like many Russian so-called emigrees,  and most Russians lucky to be born before early 1980 – I reminisce passionately about Plombir. Plombir was the ubiquitous