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The Russian loaf affair.

Where do you buy ‘our’ – nash – bread? is the question I often heard when still new to these shores. Myself being weakly dissatisfied with the ‘wonder bread’ of supermarkets. Yearning for the bread I could sink my teeth into. Black

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Georgia inspire beetloaves*.

Georgian cuisine in Soviet Union was always viewed as something like French cooking in Western Europe. Or perhaps more like Tuskan leaning Italian actually. Sophisticated, exquisite, generous. Both hugely desired and, well, envied. I find it quite curious that these

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*That* Borsch-in-a-pie.

There is a little story about the birth of this pie – now, frankly, legendary (says Katrina!) on all Russian Revels events. When Karina’s mum used to make Borscht (or borsch?? ahh)  she first sautéed the beetroot with the vegetables

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Woosy faces, food gratis and gooseberry dressing.

Until the age of 10 I lived in what many dreamily how recall as the Soviet courtyard. I have most vivid recollections of lazit za kryzhovnikom – sort of climbing into and around gooseberry bushes, lazily picking them up, plonking them into my mouth, chatting to girlfriends.

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‘The-quickest-ever-yes-really-pickled-cucumbers’

Solenya is a Russian word for any salted (sol is salt of course) vegetables. the English ‘pickles’ doesn’t quite convey the same breadth of meaning. The sheer variety of uses and processes that Slavs endue their salted staff. In Slavic

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If Marilyn Monroe was a cake – sweet n salty brownies.

There are foods in the world which are the equivalent to Marilyn Monroe – irresistible, full-bodied, they are inevitably, irrevocably liked and desired by all…Buckwheat brownies with sunflower seed and salt butter.

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Deer, blood, chocolate and Kagor in a stew.

Stews are never sexy food, they say. Warming and hearty is rarely what we hanker after when in search of more exquisite pleasures, be it food or well, else. But add in muscular and less than expected flavours, and you

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Borodinsky rye arancini.

I’m certain that in the old days my peasant ancestors made many a kasha with this very grain, but I’ve yet to see someone cooking with it. So I’ve started to experiment…

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Scotch egg clad in Russian herring coat

No celebratory Soviet table can do without the combo of cured herring, potatoes, eggs, onions, beetroot… and, of course, mayonnaise!

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Zapekanka (bake) of roots and caraway crumble top

Zapekanka – or a Bake in English I suppose –  is the Russian ultimate comfort, nursery food. The basic principle of mashing ingredients to their soft, unresistant core and baking them till they form a crust, is the only rule