Zakuski

Marrow caviar ‘as we remember it’.

This ‘caviar’ used to be amongst the only products always available in the good old days of Soviet Union. So more-ish nevertheless. When I was little I could never understand why the mixture is dark red/brown! Long stewing, addition of

Zakuski

As battle continues – Cutlets a la Kiev.

Is it worrisome or more comforting to write about food ‘a la Kiev’ today, when the streets of the Ukrainian capital are flooded with events and people seemingly so removed from the joys of a full belly? Food – and

Zakuski

Olivier salad, the original dirty, damn good dish.

A pile of boiled potatoes in skins, boiled carrots – not a very exciting bunch at first glance, a selection of cans and jars… Then you start peeling, cubing, slicing, chopping… Cubes of pale potatoes in a bowl are now

Zakuski

Borodinsky rye arancini.

I’m certain that in the old days my peasant ancestors made many a kasha with this very grain, but I’ve yet to see someone cooking with it. So I’ve started to experiment…

Zakuski

Scotch egg clad in Russian herring coat

No celebratory Soviet table can do without the combo of cured herring, potatoes, eggs, onions, beetroot… and, of course, mayonnaise!

Zakuski

Scotch, no Rus eggs. With herring

More and more I’m realising just how many similarities there are between our (our?) British food, especially Scottish, and our (our?) Russian food. It’s the ingredients that make me think that in particular. Isn’t it right that the European part

Zakuski

On tongue relish and why size matters

There is certainly something vaguely titillating about being able to utter – Russian tongues, anyone? – when lowering yourself to a hungry diner. I then add – Organic, salt beef in fact, over which I’ve been labouring for the last