Cuisine: Russian/Soviet

Cake bake-off winners – Napoleon No 10.

Irina is my compatriot. Originally from Kohtla-Yarve, a town in the Eastern part of Estonia that has a very high percentage of ethnic Russians, she came to the UK 14 years ago at the time when many of … ‘us’

Cuisine: Russian/Soviet

Soviet Brunchclub – pies, virgins and piemes.

‘Thank you for letting us loose our virginity…’ they said at the end of an evening. Oh, don’t you just love giving people their firsts. their first Russian pie, their first uunderground restaurant, their first ‘proper’ tumble of Russian vodka,

Cuisine: Russian/Soviet

Salo (pork fat) pizza.

Pizza with pure pork fat as its main topping is unlikely to appear on your Pizza Express menu, granted. Pizza with Ukrainian cured pork fat – salo – is even less likely. But the combination makes a lot more sense

Cuisine: Russian/Soviet

Little poorly soviet pies.

Soviet pie. The soviet pie. There was a saying about soviet pies: «Если вы съели пирожок и не обнаружили в нем начинки – знайте, он был с мясом!» or ‘If you’ve eaten a pie and haven’t discovered any filling inside

Cuisine: Russian/Soviet

Autumnal breakfasts: Jewish cheese spread.

There is something about me, autumn and breakfasts. It is perhaps because autumn is the ultimate (my favourite word of late)  liminal time of the year. The time when things seem to stand still and you are in-between stages, phases,

Cuisine: Russian/Soviet

Next Russian brunclub – it’s all about the pie…

‘[The pie] should be appetising, shameless in its nakedness, a temptation to sin’. Anton Chekhov If you thought that the Brits had a monopoly on loving the pie, or that pies can only be homely – I invite to re-think

Cuisine: Russian/Soviet

What to do with your pork fat left overs.

My epic journey in search of Ukrainian pork fat is to commence in exactly eight days, so in preparation, my dear readers, I will tempt you (or revolt you) with a few porky delights. You will, I have no doubt,

Cuisine: Russian/Soviet

Cooking with hay.

Hay was used extensively by Russkis in the olden days – as well as by the English folk in fact. In makes sense after all. Peasants/farmers would have masses of hay around this time of the year and need to

Cuisine: Russian/Soviet

The doughy cleveage of Mother Russia – Borodinsky bread.

“Don’t say you’re full if you haven’t touched the bread.” Russian proverb. Russian black bread, rye bread – it’s the stuff of dream, of national pride, of difference, of melancholic countryside with weeping birches and romantic images of maidens with

Cuisine: Russian/Soviet

Okroshka – those pesky Russians do have summer.

Remember Kefir, the Russian sour milk product that I have discovered in Wholefoods back in the winter? Kefir can be found in most Eastern-European shops in England, however I like ‘Nourish’ because it is made in a farm in Sussex,